7/18/2007

Alternate Endings

Posted in Links at 12:00 pm by Sam

I ran across this wonderful essay about endings, twist endings, and alternate endings. It contains spoilers for The Sixth Sense and Casablanca, and you do not want to spoil those movies for yourself if by some miracle you do not already know how they end. But if you have, check out this article. I would actually recommend skipping down to the spoiler warning and read from that point, unless you’re interested in talk about dinner theater.


7/17/2007

All Movie Talk, Episode 42

Posted in Episodes at 5:00 am by Sam

Show contents, with start times:

  • Famous Frame: E.T. (1:54)
  • Trivia Question: Michael Bay Remake (7:47)
  • Second Take: Ratatouille (8:19)
  • Top 6: Movies You’d Like To See Remade (16:46)
  • Director Spotlight: Coen Brothers, Part 2 (38:10)
  • Closing: Trivia Answer, Preview of Next Week (59:50)

Press the Play button below to listen to the podcast, or the Download link to save it. Here’s how you can download new episodes automatically.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
icon for podpress  Episode 42 [62:00m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

7/17/2007

Top 6: Movies You’d Like To See Remade

Posted in Top 6 at 4:59 am by Sam

In Episode 42, our Top 6 list is about movies we’d like to see remade. Normally we scratch our heads and roll our eyes when a new remake is announced, because Hollywood tends to remake movies that are already great and successful. What they should be doing is remaking movies that had great ideas but weren’t executed as well as they could have been. There’s no need to remake a perfect movie, but every reason to try to regain lost potential.

What movies would you like to see remade?

As always, we recommend listening to the episode before reading further.

Read the rest of this entry »


7/16/2007

Harry Potter 5 OK; IMAX 3D Not

Posted in Reviews at 9:44 am by Stephen

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a perfectly decent film, but it’s probably the lowpoint in the film series. As the least cinematic of the novels — at least until its amazing climax — it must have been a tough book to adapt, but the screenplay by Michael Goldenberg does a nice job of cutting the source material. Credit must also be given to editor Mark Day, as it feels like half the movie is told via (very well done) montage.

I made a point of catching the flick in the IMAX format, which features that climax in 3D. As much as I enjoyed the film, I am sorry to report the 3D format is a bust. While there are a few “Wow!” moments, for the most part they are not worth the loss in image clarity that results from it. I found that the process of converting the traditional cinematography into 3D is hardly perfect, as many times we see images that do not resolve correctly using the polarized 3D glasses (often there is a bit of a double vision effect).

Read the rest of this entry »


7/14/2007

Blooper: Sam Uncensored

Posted in Bloopers at 5:00 am by Sam

Not really a blooper, but if you were curious what I was really saying in the introduction to Episode 39, here it is before Stephen got his grubby fascist hands on it.

 
icon for podpress  Blooper: Sam Uncensored [0:21m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

7/13/2007

Blooper: Today

Posted in Bloopers at 5:00 am by Sam

Sometimes recording sessions don’t start right away, as demonstrated here in a bit of audio excised from Episode 38. Sometimes it just takes a few yanks on the starter cord and some fiddling with the choke to get things going.

 
icon for podpress  Blooper: Today [0:07m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

7/12/2007

Vintage: The Hays Organization

Posted in Vintage at 5:00 am by Sam

For the last three weeks in the podcast, we’ve been talking about the history of Ratings and Censorship in America. We mentioned how William Hays was appointed to establish some kind of means by which film content would be regulated as part of an effort to “clean up” Hollywood’s scandalized image with the public.

The Hays Code, also known as the Motion Picture Production Code, would be put into effect in 1934 and last for a few decades until it eventually suffered from social obsolescence. It was replaced with the MPAA ratings system we know today in 1968. But the Hays Organization had a hand in regulating film content well before 1934, albeit with less power. Here’s a little glimpse at the Hays Organization in 1927.

Read the rest of this entry »


7/10/2007

All Movie Talk, Episode 41

Posted in Episodes at 5:00 am by Sam

Show contents, with start times:

  • Director Spotlight: Coen Brothers, Part 1 (1:33)
  • Trivia Question: Vampire Without Makeup (22:01)
  • Top 6: Film Noir (22:48)
  • Industry Trend: Ratings and Censorship, Part 3 (39:48)
  • Closing: Trivia Answer, Preview of Next Week (57:00)

Press the Play button below to listen to the podcast, or the Download link to save it. Here’s how you can download new episodes automatically.

Read the rest of this entry »

 
icon for podpress  Episode 41 [58:58m]: Play Now | Play in Popup | Download

7/10/2007

Top 6: Film Noir

Posted in Top 6 at 4:59 am by Sam

For Episode 41’s Top 6 segment, we tried to pick the best six films noir. We covered film noir back in Episode 20, and here is a loosely connected continuation of that discussion. As it turned out, though, neither one of us could choose how to prune down the possibilities — there are just too many great ones — and so Sam restricted himself to only choosing classic noir films and still wound up with seven, and Stephen gave up trying to rank the movies and just contented himself with picking six great films representative of the genre.

What are your favorites?

As always, we recommend listening to the episode before reading further.

Read the rest of this entry »


7/9/2007

The Joy of Process

Posted in Side Topics at 11:59 am by Sam

In the podcast, we’ve mentioned the attraction of movies that illustrate some kind of process or craft. For some reason, movies that delve into the details of showing someone engaged in some kind of meticulous process is interesting. I’m not entirely sure why.

Read the rest of this entry »

« Previous entries · Next entries »